The TT route revisited

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Having survived a full days ride without bike issues, Mark and I started planning another days riding. A check on the forecast though showed that tomorrows weather was bringing potentially severe storms which put paid to the idea of a full days ride, so we agreed to postpone until later in the week. I reckoned though, that I could probably get round one of my favourite rides, the TT route in 4 hours, but with the storms which had been forecast as due at 14.00 now changed to midday and possibly even 11.00, I’d need to leave very early.

The next morning mindful of the coming storms, I was up early, had breakfast, and was dressed and had fired up the GT and had set off at 06.21am. Within 50 metres the bike decided to play it’s occasional game of flashing up a lights out warning symbol. Knowing that the garage had just replaced a bulb I stopped, switched everything off, restarted the bike, checked the lights, and lo and behold all was working. Scare over, it was time to get going.

The autoroute is less than one minute from the house, I joined it and 13 minutes later a bunch of sequential numbers appeared on the dash, all the 8’s, 88,888 marking advanced age and even more kms  on the battle bus.

It’s 18C even this early in the morning but already commuters are heading into Geneva from Lausanne, and I’m amused how aggressively someone in a small red Honda is trying to overtake the small red Citroen in front of him, often times speeding up the inside lane trying to undertake it. Must be keen to get to work!

Soon I’m passing through the unmanned douane at Ferney Voltaire and passing Prevessin en route to the roundabout near Cern, before joining the Thoiry bypass. I’m careful to keep to the 110 speed limit as there are often radars along this stretch of road, but not today, it’s too early for the police to be about and besides, most of the traffic is heading into Geneva not away from it as I’m doing. Many many years ago I maxxed out my Honda Blackbird on this stretch of road, but that was LONG before radars were placed on it. There are plenty of buzzards flying overhead this morning, shame Sue’s not with me this morning as she loves watching them, but she preferred to stay and catch upon some sleep, so I watch as they soar above.

We had been diverted en route to Bellegarde on Saturdays ride, so today I take the diversion signs crossing the river, and then turn right through the rows of orchards beneath their gossamer like covers, and head toward the viewing point of Fort L’Ecluse, but today I’m taking pictures of the valley back towards Geneva not the fort.

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The road has been resurfaced along some of this stretch and I’m enjoying the smooth tarmac until it ends and I’m faced with my least favourite obstacle, tar snakes. Superman had kryptonite, I have tar snakes. Faced with these demonic slivers of raised tarmac I become fixated by their positioning and take all sorts of bizarre lines to avoid them. Years ago I had a really bad ride on country roads where the whole surface seemed to be these snakes. The bike slipping and sliding so badly I thought I’d got a puncture. Stopping several times to check the tyre pressures, eventually I realised it was the tar snakes, and even though some years later a fellow rider tried to assuage my issues by deliberately accelerating over them to show it was safe, I have never got over been massively unnerved by them, maybe some therapy or hypnosis might help?

Passing through Clarafond I join the main road dropping down into Bellegarde, skirt around the city and soon join the road out towards Chatillon en Michaille and the start of the my favourite stretch of road. This section to Nantua is the same as we’d ridden on Saturday, but as it has a sequence of some of my favourite bends I’m not complaining.

In Nantua the diversions are still in place but this time I know the drill and am soon out the other side of town and passing alongside the lake out of town. At the roundabout I turn left, then it’s off to the Gorges du Cerdon around 10 minutes up the road  More great bends and well surfaced, it’s a blast to have the roads almost to myself, and descending the gorges I decide to go back and take some pictures, but not until I’ve taken this one at the bottom.

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For probably 7 years I rode down this road passing the statue at the bottom, and one day when I asked my riding buddies about the statue, not one of them had noticed it!! A quick blast half way back up for these pictures then it’s off again.

 

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The next stretch is a boring transition but only takes about 10 minutes before it’s back to the good stuff again and the amazing stretch from Les Hopiteaux to Piegeu. There’s a right hand bend nearing Belley that even at 160kph (alledgedly) goes on for 20 seconds. Once I was leading a group of 4 and we took this bend at 120 (alledgedly), only to be followed by a police motorcyclist who had been manning a radar on a layby on the other side of the road. Luckily as we’d been riding closely together he couldn’t register individual speeds so we got let off with a little “chat”, amazing bend though!!!.

Knowing the storms were coming I resisted the option to stop at McDonalds near Belley and kept going, stopping only to take these shots. The first near Belley and the second two looking across to the Jura near Clarafond.

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The return leg was uneventful and an hour and a half later I was back with the GPS showing EXACTLY four hours riding time. Skip back to the first paragraph and you’ll see my estimated time to get round had been 4 hours, am I good or what?!

So another great circuit ridden and another 328kms covered without cooling problems. With just the faulty light out reading which I hope I can clear with a GS-911 tool, hopefully there will be some days to come where I’ll have a fuss free ride!

 


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