Tentative first ride after radiator problems

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15 or so years of riding Japanese bikes has shown me that it’s possible to turn the key in the ignition every day, have the engine start, and ride for tens of thousands of miles without breaking down, if faults existed they were relatively minor, and looking back on my riding history (perhaps through rose tinted glasses) I don’t remember too many issues with whichever Kawasaki, Suzuki, and Honda I’ve owned. I’ll admit that there was the well known regulator/rectifier fault on the Hondas, but they’re known for it and it’s almost an acceptable fault as nothing else goes wrong. My R1 had a TPS fault but didn’t actually break down, and only my beloved RC 45 left me needing a trailer ride home after its regulator failed, but these were all isolated incidences and NOTHING else ever went wrong, it’s only the BMW’s I’ve owned that have managed to leave me stranded, and on more than one occasion.

The first breakdown came on a K1200GT demonstrator I bought from a dealer. BMW saw fit to create an electrically assisted braking system, which whilst being boosted by battery assistance, suffered the fate that if the battery started to discharge in stop start traffic with constant braking, it would fail, as happened to me on a trip to Luxembourg in motorway roadworks. Strike 1.

Strike 2 came within 3moths of the purchase of a brand new K1300GT which replaced the K1200GT, when the ECU failed.

In fact there have been several occasions over the past couple of years, notably at altitude and in very hot weather, when the bike has refused to start or needed bump starting, culminating in various changes of switchgear (at no small cost) and a lot of inconvenience. A booster plug helped the poor running, but combine this with driveshaft bearings which self destruct every 30,000kms, and you’re probably wondering why I’m still riding the GT, especially after the latest overheating problem?

I guess it’s because I don’t actually know what I’d replace it with, and probably because after having ridden it for the past 7 years in restricted 100bhp mode I’d quite like to enjoy the full fat 160bhp it has now it has been derestricted. In truth I’m a little worried about the impact of suddenly having an extra 60bhp on an engine that has had such an easy life with only 100bhp for so long, but for now I’ve got a sickly machine that may or may not be ok after its overheating incident, so all I can do is ride it and find out, so here’s what happened after its first ride after having been side lined with radiator problems.

It’s the day after I collected the bike from the dealer, and Mark and I have decided to do a relatively local ride on some of my favourite roads. The distance won’t be so great that if there are issues it will take a day to get trailered back home, but will be far enough to enjoy. Planning to arrive at Marks at 10.00am we arrive as the clock strikes the hour. Marks K1600GT is warming up and we’re soon off, stopping at the petrol station at the local supermarket. Signs warning of a diversion to Bellegarde suggest we take a different route, but we continued on past Fort L’Ecluse and the winding road to Bellegarde, which we can enjoy as it has very little traffic on it this morning. 5kms outside Bellegarde we reach the roadworks and diversion onto small backroads as a sign indicates the road ahead is closed for roadworks until April 2017!

Eventually we end up on the outskirts of Bellegarde and joining the road we want to take towards Chatillon en Michaille, and from there onwards to Nantua. There are some great sequences of bends on this route, and overtaking any cars ahead of me I’m able to get maximum enjoyment of them.

In Nantua there are yet more diversions. It’s summer so the French are digging up the roads and sending you on badly signposted diversions to wherever they think you might want to go. We stopped so I could mount the GoPro before climbing the TT hill coming out of Thoirette . This hill has a great surface, great bends, takes two minutes to ascend even flat out, and you only need to back off slightly for two corners until you reach the top and the great viewing point there.

Strangely, given it’s mid season, our target restaurant at Pont Le Pyle is closed, but there are others close by, and after a jambon/fromage sandwich, coke and ice cream have been consumed, we’re off again, this time Mark leading, with the destination being the Source du Lison, which he tells me was full to overflowing last time he visited a couple of weeks earlier. I should have known better than to believe it when he told me he knew the way though, as 25 minutes later we are arriving at Lizon (spelt with a Z ) not in Salins where we should be to see the Lison, neverthless the sun is shining, we’ve got all day, and at the moment the GT isn’t showing any signs of repeating it’s overheating issues, despite the warm temperatures.

An hour or so later and after some searching around due to poor signposting, we eventually arrived at our destination, where the source of the river Loue has it’s  origin. It’s hot though, so our first call is the cafe by the side of the river for a couple of refreshing drinks before the short walk to the water gushing from the hillside.

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Here’s one of Marks shots using a “proper” camera

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Here’s a picture of Mark and his super expensive camera which he spent forever composing shots with. Apparently he take lots of the same shots but on different settings, and then manipulates them in Photoshop. Check out picture 3 above

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After seemingly hours waiting for Mark to compose his pictures, we decided that as it’s still only late afternoon, we’d take advantage of the opportunity of having Mark  show us somewhere we’d not been before, the Cascades du Tuf, which are on the way back anyway, so off we shouldn’t have any navigational problems getting there?

Parking the bikes up later the 300m uphill walk is an efffort in the heat, but here’s the waterfalls at the top.

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We couldn’t help noticing how much this tree stump looked like a rabbit

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After cooling off in the shade whilst Marks 5 minutes of photo taking took 20, it was eventually time to head for home. Mark having realised that he was due at his neighbours at 20.00 might just about make it back in time, but we decided to stop off in Champagnole for a McDonalds and toilet break. Later we decided to descend via Arzier rather than the 73 hairpin bends of St Cergue, and as we headed back down it was pleasant to see the evening sun setting over the Alps and Lac Leman.

Arrtiving back at 21.15 with 518kms having been ridden, it had been a long day, but the bike had behaved and never got beyond 2 bars on the temperature gauge, so now I’m wondering whether I do actually need the new radiator the dealer wanted to sell me? I guess for now I’ll just keep riding it and see how things develop.


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